Facial Ageing Facts

Facial Ageing used to be regarded mainly as gravity assisted sagging of the soft tissues of the face. Recent research has shown that bony changes can also contribute to facial ageing. As we grow older the facial muscles thin down and put less strain on the bones, causing the bones to become weaker. On the face this can be seen as flattening of the cheek bones.

In some cases the lower facial height (the area between the nose and chin) of your face decreases. This loss of facial height is a major contributor to facial ageing as the skin around the face and neck sags and the signs of facial ageing become exaggerated.

Cosmetic surgeons think of the face in terms of a triangle. In youth the base of the triangle is at the cheeks and the point is at the chin. As we get older the triangle reverses. The formation of the jowls means that the base of the triangle is now at the chin and the tip goes upwards towards the nose.

Up until now surgery was the only answer to reverse the triangle. But after a short time the soft tissues would sag again. Now there is another answer – the Oralift Facial Rejuvenation and the ADD Dentalfacelift . These can reverse the triangle and seem to put the ageing process into reverse gear. As we get older, the face keeps on improving. (See the long term effects). The pictures below show this reversal of the triangle with the Oralift facial rejuvenation.

Oralift Before Picture
Oralift Before Picture

Before

Before

Oralift After Picture
Oralift After Picture
After
After
Oralift Before Picture
Oralift Before Picture

Before

Before

Oralift After Picture
Oralift After Picture
After
After

The ADD Dental Facelift achieves even more dramatic results if lower facial height has been lost. The result of these has been published in the British Dental Journal and showed that patients looked between 5 and 20 years younger.

As early as the 20’s the main symptoms of facial ageing begin to appear. Ageing of the skin is caused by external factors such as the sun, smoking and air pollution. At this age most of the damage is sun related.

facial-ageing

In the 30’s the upper eyelid skin starts to become loose and lines start to appear around the nose and mouth. In the late thirties the corners of the eyes and mouth start to droop downwards.

In the 40’s wrinkles start to appear on the forehead; crows feet begin to appear around the eyes and the jaw line starts to sag leading to the early formation of jowls. Cheeks are starting to flatten a little.

In the 50’s the upper eyelid sagging may reach the eyelashes; the droop on the corners of the eye starts to give a ‘sad’ look. The nose tip tends to droop and wrinkles begin to appear around the lips and neck. The skin on the cheeks starts to become loose and the rounder cheeks of youth flatten.

In the 60’s all wrinkles deepen and there is a decrease in eye size from the progressive encroachment from the surrounding lid skin. Skin also becomes thinner and drier.

In the 70’s signs of advanced ageing appear making the face more skeleton like. By this age the muscle mass on the face has decreased by 40%